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    Lackawanna CollegeCurrent NewsFalcon HeadlinesCollege breathing new life into Adams Avenue buildings

    College breathing new life into Adams Avenue buildings

    Lackawanna College President Mark Volk stands in the courtyard between two buildings of the Scranton Center at the corner of Adams Ave. and Mulberry St in Scranton.  Photo courtesy of Scranton Times-Tribune

    Lackawanna College President Mark Volk stands in the courtyard between two buildings of the Scranton Center in the 400 block of Adams Avenue in Scranton.
    Photo courtesy of Scranton Times-Tribune

    SCRANTON, Pa. – Two underutilized properties in downtown Scranton are in the process of being purchased by Lackawanna College to further its mission of providing a world-class education to the people of northeastern Pennsylvania.

    The College today, July 24, announced its plans to purchase and renovate 401 and 409 Adams Avenue, buildings already situated within its existing footprint in downtown Scranton. The properties were previously known as Adams Plaza and, more recently, the Scranton Center.

    By adding to its footprint in downtown Scranton, Lackawanna College shows its dedication to addressing current student needs and planning for inevitable growth to best serve NEPA residents. Eighty percent of Lackawanna’s students come from the region and attend classes at the main campus in Scranton or at centers in Hawley, Hazleton, the School of Petroleum & Natural Gas in New Milford, and Towanda.

    The 110,000-square-foot two-building complex is expected to include cafeteria space; a teaching kitchen for the Culinary Arts and Hospitality degree programs; a one-stop shop providing students access to financial aid, business, and administrative offices; classroom space; and more.

    By investing in downtown Scranton, the institution continues to follow its history of restoring old buildings for modern use. That process began in the mid-1990s with the renovation of the former Scranton Central High School at 501 Vine Street into what is known today as Angeli Hall, the main academic building on campus.

    Founded in 1894, Lackawanna has trained generations of hard-working professionals. The buildings on Adams Avenue help the College realize that goal and prepare for the next step in its storied history.

    More details about the Adams Avenue project will be released in the coming weeks.

     

    Read more in today’s Scranton Times-Tribune.

    View the WNEP report

    Courtesy WBRE